Category: Data Structures & Algorithms


This project refers to an Arduino library implementing a generic, dynamic stack (array version).

The data structure is implemented as a class in C++.

For more information, you can get the project itself ‘StackArray‘.

In this article I will present to you a dynamic string data structure helper implementation. In C, a string is just an array of characters terminated with the null character (NUL in ASCII). Also, some times we handle a string by using a pointer to a buffer containing sequential characters terminated also with the null character. The C standard liibrary provides various functions for string manipulation but it seems that whenever we want to extend a string by using pointers we have to perform all the time memory reallocation which leads to a bad evolution of replicated code. In a recent project, I needed to create a string and append to it any number of new strings in order to extend it without using strcat, strcpy, strlen and realloc functions all the time. So, I created a simple dynamic string data structure which solved my specific problem and I would like to share it with you people.

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Below, is an Arduino function for reading smoothly an average value from a jumpy or erratic analog input sensor. The function reads repeatedly from an analog input, calculating a running average and returns the value back to the caller.

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The following function is applied onto a graph and it specifically implements the method of breadth-first search. To visit all nodes connected to node k of a graph, we put the k in a FIFO queue and then go into a loop, during which we get the next node from the queue and, if we have not already visited it, we visit it and push into the queue all nodes belonging to the adjacency list of this node, continuing this process until we empty the queue.

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The iterative (non-recursive) function preorderTreeTraverse() can perform preorder traversing of a binary tree with the help of a stack that can hold pointers to nodes of the tree.

Also, the iterative (non-recursive) function layerTreeTraverse() can perform level-order traversing of a binary tree with the help of a queue that can hold pointers to nodes of the tree.

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The elegant recursive solution to a problem is most of the times invaluable. Although the iterative solution of that problem is likely to have a better space and time complexity, it is often preferred to use the recursive version for clarity and simplicity. It is remarkable how easily a problem can be solved by use of a recursive manner. In this article we will try to record a collection of useful recursive functions:

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The following program demonstrates a significant processing operation on arrays of strings. More precisely, we present the re-sorting of a set of strings in order to classify them. So, we read the strings and place them in a temporary storage area (buffer) large enough to be able to store all, keeping in an array a pointer to each string. Then we re-sort the pointers (only pointers and not strings to increase the performance) to place the pointer to the “smallest” string at the first position of the array, the pointer to the next “largest” string at the second position of the array, and so on.

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The following program reads a set of edges that define a graph and creates a representation of this graph with an adjacency list. The adjacency list of a graph is an array of lists, one for each vertex, where the j-th list contains a linked list of the nodes which are connected with the j-th vertex.

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The following program reads a set of edges that define an undirected graph and creates a representation of this graph with an adjacency matrix, giving a[i][j] and a[j][i] the value of 1 if there is an edge from i to j or from j to i in the graph, or the value of 0 if it does not exist. Also, we assume that the number of vertices V is a constant known at compilation time. Otherwise, there should be dynamic memory allocation for the array that represents the adjacency matrix.

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The following program finds all the occurrences of a word in a text string. We set the text string as an array of characters of fixed size (although we could, instead, use the operator ‘new’) and read it from the standard input using the function cin.get(). The memory allocation for the word entered in the command line and passed on as argument is done by the system before this program is called and we find the pointer to the string in argv[1]. For every starting position i in the array a, tries to associate the substring starting from this position with the p, checking character by character for equality. Each time we reach the end of p successfully, we display the starting position (i) of the word in the text on the screen.

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Below there are some basic processing functions of strings in C. The implementations are approached with the pointers of C, thus creating faster and more compact code.

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The following program generates N random integers between 0 and 999, creates a linked list inserting a number in each node and then rearranges the nodes of the list so that the numbers appear sorted when we go through the list. For the sorting, it maintains two lists: one input list (not sorted) and one output list (sorted). In each iteration of the loop, it removes a node from the input list and enters it in the appropriate position in the output list. The code is simplified by using head nodes for each list, which contains links to the first node lists. Also, both lists (input and output) are printed.

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This program demonstrates the use of an array and is representative of the usual situation in which we store data in one array to process them later. It counts the number of pairs of N randomly generated points of the unit square, which can be connected to a line segment of length less than ‘d’, using the point data type. Because the execution time of this program is O(n2), it can’t be used for large N.

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The function ‘reverse’ in the following example reverses the links in a list, returning a pointer to the end node, which then shows the next of the last node, and so forth, while the link to the first node of the initial list is assigned the value 0 corresponding to null pointer (in C++). To accomplish this task, we must maintain links to three consecutive nodes in the list.

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For the representation of individuals arranged in a circle, we create a circular linked list with a combination of each person to the person on his left in the circle. The integer i represents the i-th person in the circle. After you create a circular list of one node for 1, we insert its unique node to nodes 2 to N. We end up with a cycle from 1 to N, with x indicating the node N. Then, starting from 1 we omit M-1 nodes, we define the pointer of the (M-1)-th node to omit the M-th, and continue that way until only one node remains in the list.

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The aim of this program is to assign to a[i] the value 1 if i is a prime number and the value 0 if not. Initially, all elements of the array take the value 1 to indicate that there are no numbers which are known not to be prime. Then all elements of the array corresponding to indexes that are known not to be primes (multiples of known primes) take the value 0. If a[i] has the value 1 even after all multiples of smaller primes have taken the value 0, we know that i is a prime number.

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The program generally simulates a Bernoulli trials sequence, a familiar and abstract notion of probability theory. So, if you flip a coin N times, we expect “head” to occur N/2 times – but it could occur anything between 0 and N times. The program performs the experiment M times, reading the N and M from the command line. It uses an array ‘f’ to count the frequency with which the result “i heads” appears for 0 <= i <= N, and then displays a histogram of the results of experiments with an asterisk for every 10 appearances. Also, the operation behind the program – of indexing an array with a calculated value – is critical to the effectiveness of many computational procedures.

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Sequential Search.

This algorithm checks whether the number ‘v’ is contained in a set of numbers already stored in the data a[0], a[1], …, a[r-1] of the array ‘a’ (where ‘r’ the number of elements in it), comparing it sequentially with all numbers, starting from the beginning. If the check reaches the end without finding the number, the value -1 is returned. Otherwise, we are returned the index of the position of the one-dimensional array containing the number.

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This project refers to an Arduino library implementing a generic, dynamic queue (array version).

The data structure is implemented as a class in C++.

For more information, you can get the project itself ‘QueueArray‘.

If we replace the loops ‘for’ of the simple version of weighted quick-union (you’ll find it in a previous article) with the following code, we reduce the length of each route passing to the half. The end result of this change is that after a long sequence of operations the trees end up almost level.

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This program reads from the standard input a sequence of pairs of non-negative integers which are less than N (interpreting the pair [p q] as a “link of the object p to object q”) and displays the pairs that represent those objects which are not yet connected. The program complies with the array ‘id’ to include an entry for each object and applies that id[q] and id[p] are equal if and only if p and q are connected.

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If we replace the body of the while loop of the quick-find algorithm (you can find it in a previous article) with the following code we have a program that meets the same specifications as the quick-find algorithm but performs fewer calculations for the act of union, to the expense of more calculations for act of finding. The ‘for’ loop and the ‘if’ operation that follows in this code determine the necessary and sufficient conditions in the array ‘id’ that p and q be linked. The act of union is implemented by the assignment id[i] = j.

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This program is a modification of the simple quick-union algorithm (you’ll find it in a previous article). It uses an extra array ‘sz’ to store the number of nodes for each object with id[i] == i in the corresponding “tree”, so the act of union to be able to connect the smaller of the two specified “trees” with the largest, and thus avoid the formation of large paths in “trees”.

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This project refers to an Arduino library for implementing a generic, dynamic queue (linked list version).

The data structure is implemented as a class in C++.

For more information, you can get the project itself ‘QueueList‘.

This project refers to an Arduino library implementing a generic, dynamic stack (linked list version).

The data structure is implemented as a class in C++.

For more information, you can get the project itself ‘StackList‘.

The presence of errors in software development (and not only) is inevitable. However, over time the programs improve and tend to perfection through various techniques and methods we have developed.

The deterministic problems are easy to spot because they always lead to the same error. There are tools that run through the source code of an application to find possible deterministic errors (these tools are especially useful in applications written with scripting languages such as Python, Bash Scripting, etc).

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