Archive for March 8, 2011


The following program demonstrates a significant processing operation on arrays of strings. More precisely, we present the re-sorting of a set of strings in order to classify them. So, we read the strings and place them in a temporary storage area (buffer) large enough to be able to store all, keeping in an array a pointer to each string. Then we re-sort the pointers (only pointers and not strings to increase the performance) to place the pointer to the “smallest” string at the first position of the array, the pointer to the next “largest” string at the second position of the array, and so on.

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The following program reads a set of edges that define a graph and creates a representation of this graph with an adjacency list. The adjacency list of a graph is an array of lists, one for each vertex, where the j-th list contains a linked list of the nodes which are connected with the j-th vertex.

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The following program reads a set of edges that define an undirected graph and creates a representation of this graph with an adjacency matrix, giving a[i][j] and a[j][i] the value of 1 if there is an edge from i to j or from j to i in the graph, or the value of 0 if it does not exist. Also, we assume that the number of vertices V is a constant known at compilation time. Otherwise, there should be dynamic memory allocation for the array that represents the adjacency matrix.

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The following program finds all the occurrences of a word in a text string. We set the text string as an array of characters of fixed size (although we could, instead, use the operator ‘new’) and read it from the standard input using the function cin.get(). The memory allocation for the word entered in the command line and passed on as argument is done by the system before this program is called and we find the pointer to the string in argv[1]. For every starting position i in the array a, tries to associate the substring starting from this position with the p, checking character by character for equality. Each time we reach the end of p successfully, we display the starting position (i) of the word in the text on the screen.

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